Things you’ll need:
Tape Measure, Several Pieces of Paper
Pen or Pencil, Ruler or Scale Rule, Rubber

 

Pencils

 

On your piece of paper sketch the shape of your kitchen taking into consideration all the ‘ins and outs’, this is just a survey so the lengths of line don’t have to be totally accurate but it does have to be topographically correct ie all the ‘ins and outs’ have to be correct. Don’t forget to mark on the doors and windows along with the architraves around them (these often get overlooked).

 

Sharpener

 

Measure each section of wall in millimeters and write it on the corresponding piece of wall on the your sketch plan, making sure that you mark the drawing in some way so that you know where the measurement starts and ends.

 

Sketch any elevations that are going to have cupboards on, drawing in windows, window sills, doors and the architraves around them.

 

Pencils 2

 

Measure the height of the windows, measure from the floor to the sill, the thickness of the sill, the height of the window, the width of the window and the widths of the architraves around them for each window. Do the same for each door. Finally make a note of the ceiling height and any beams that may hang down plus the heights of old chimney recesses etc that you may be going to utilise.

 

Make a note of all the services in the room, like gas and electricity mains/meters, incoming water mains and pipes that can’t be moved. Sketch them on your plans and elevations and make a note of the dimension to their furthest extremities.

 

You now need to draw the plan and elevations up at 1 to 20. You can print off and use our handy ‘graph paper’ from which is marked out in squares, each square on the paper representing a 100mm (10cm) square or if you prefer use a 1 to 20 scale rule and plain paper. It’s important to resolve the plan, sometimes when drawing a long wall that you measured in lots of little bits because it had lots of ‘ins and outs’ or windows and doors, the wall might end up a little longer than it really is, in this case it’s a good idea to take an overall dimension as a double check.

Often a room isn’t square, so when you go to join up the final wall on your carefully drawn plan it doesn’t meet, if this is the case you can take diagonal measurements across the room with a long tape, if you then draw an arc at this length to scale from one of the corners, you will know that the other corner lies somewhere along the arc. Sometimes rooms are very out of shape and quite hard to resolve on plan, if this is the case and you are only putting cupboards say on one or two walls it’s not worth struggling further with the plan, just draw the walls you are putting the cupboards on.

 

Tape Measure

 

Measure each section of wall in millimeters and write it on the corresponding piece of wall on the your sketch plan, making sure that you mark the drawing in some way so that you know where the measurement starts and ends.